Jump to content
IGNORED

Why Reverse A Rear Tire When Put On The Front?


Recommended Posts

I've probably read the reason for reversing a M/C rear tire when put on the front, but I don't remember the reason. Could someone please enlighten me on the reason to do this.

 

Thanks,

 

Glenn

Link to post
Share on other sites

What the Avon rep told me is that the way the belt ends are lapped give the tire a better ability to withstand torque in one direction. On the rear tire the lap is positioned to withstand the torque of acceleration where on the front the lap is positioned to handle braking torque.

 

Of course if you turn the tire around the tread pattern will run the wrong way. This might create other issues.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just mounted a Metzeler rear tire on the front of my RSV and went with the arrow... so far so good... I remember reading about mounting it backwards but my tire guy said it wouldn't shed water right backwards so I went with the arrow... I'll keep you posted... I got about 2000 miles so far on it..

Link to post
Share on other sites
I just mounted a Metzeler rear tire on the front of my RSV and went with the arrow... so far so good... I remember reading about mounting it backwards but my tire guy said it wouldn't shed water right backwards so I went with the arrow... I'll keep you posted... I got about 2000 miles so far on it..

 

 

Metzler actually recommends on their website to reverse the arrow when doing this.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I guess if you could have posted a link to that it would be helpful... Cuz I just searched their site for a 1/2 hour and couldn't find any mention of what you're saying...

 

Gee a 5 minute google search turned up this:

 

20. Arrow = The arrow indicates the rotation direction of the tyre accordingly to its fitting position (front or rear). In case a rear tyre is fitted on a front wheel, the tyre has to be fitted reverse to the rotating direction indicated on the sidewall. Fitment of front tyres on rear wheel is not permitted.

 

 

about 3/4 of the way down the page

Link to post
Share on other sites

A simple way of putting it, is that the rear tire pushes, while the front tire is pushed. The tread on the rear tire is designed to bite while pushing. a front tire is designed to push through, while being pushed, opposing jobs you might say, and this is why you would reverse the rear tire when mounted on the front.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had an old timer motorcycle mechanic tell me that front and rear motorcycle tires used to be one and the same thing, and the tire would have an arrow pointing one way for front usage and another arrow pointing the other way for rear usage.

 

Compare the direction of the tread patterns of a front tire and a rear tire and you'll find that the tread patterns run opposite of each other. When a rear tire is used on the front, the tire needs to be reversed so that the tread pattern runs the correct direction, the same as a front tire would run, and whoever mounts it by the arrow mounts it backwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

MY Bad... I was searching Metzelers USA site and was searching rear tire on front.. Not tyre... and that sidewall reading chart does'nt show up on the USA page... Well I guess I'll flip the whole wheel around and see how that goes... Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

I have two front tires that I pulled off of my bike, that still have lots of tread on them. My son needs a rear tire for his bike, and they are the same size. Any issues with turning the tire against the arrow, and putting it on the rear?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have two front tires that I pulled off of my bike, that still have lots of tread on them. My son needs a rear tire for his bike, and they are the same size. Any issues with turning the tire against the arrow, and putting it on the rear?

 

One of the earlier posts quoted Metzeler as saying it's not permissible to mount a front tire in the rear position.

 

Typically, front tires have a much lower load rating than rear. I wonder if that is the issue.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a Dunlop Elite 3. Here are the specs...

 

Rear: MT90B16 H (130 mph) 74 (827 lbs)

 

Front: MT90B16 H (130 mph) 72 (783 lbs)

 

So, not a big difference in the load ratings. We would be putting it on the rear of a 1982 Suzuki GS850L. Much lighter than an RSV.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My guess would be that a rear tire must be able to withstand both braking and accelerating stresses with the emphasis on the acceleration. that is why you reverse a rear on the front, it can still handle the stress. If you put a front tire on the rear, The front tire was only designed to handle stress of braking and may not have the internal structure to withstand BOTH acceleration and braking.

 

When the manufacturer specifically says don't do it, I generally follow that recommendation.

 

I am sure that you would not want to have your son risk a rear blowout during a panic stop to save a couple of dollars.

Link to post
Share on other sites
MY Bad... I was searching Metzelers USA site and was searching rear tire on front.. Not tyre... and that sidewall reading chart does'nt show up on the USA page... Well I guess I'll flip the whole wheel around and see how that goes... Thanks

I think the wheel has a directional arrow also.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the wheel has a directional arrow also.

 

Let me know if it does...I noticed when the dealer mounted my front that the arrow was backward. They just flipped the whole wheel around to make the tire run forward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

22000 miles on my Dunlop404 rear tire on the front of my Venture not reversed.Due to cupping I had to change it and now have 16000 miles on the second Dunlop mounted in the arrow direction.Works for me and not ready to put another front tire on the front.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I had an old timer motorcycle mechanic tell me that front and rear motorcycle tires used to be one and the same thing, and the tire would have an arrow pointing one way for front usage and another arrow pointing the other way for rear usage.

 

 

 

My Electra Glide is like that, as the tire sizes are the same. 1 direction for back and the other for the front.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lets see. 80% of braking force is on the front. 100% of acceleration force is on the rear. That said car tires seen to have found a way to accommodate this. Then there is the hydraulics to worry about. To much figuring for me.

Mike

Link to post
Share on other sites

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tires Directional Arrows Explained By Avon Tyres

Published by Cyril Huze August 23rd, 2009 in Builders, Editorial and Wheels.

Before we can talk about directional arrows you must first understand a bit about tread patterns.

There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that

is to disperse water. (dust, dirt)

A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction.

Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum

water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice.

What is a tread splice? When a tire is manufactured the tread portion of the tire starts out as

a long flat strip. This strip is wrapped around the tire and the two ends are cut on an angle

so one end overlaps the other rather than having square cut ends.

This overlapping point or splice offers a bigger surface area to bond together, rather than the

small surface area provided by square cut ends. (Imagine gluing your fingertips together, as

opposed to gluing along the entire length of your fingers laid on top of each other. Like an

angled splice, the overlapping fingers result in a much stronger bond).

To further ensure the strength of this bond along the tread splice the directional arrow will show

you which way to mount the tire so that when the rider is “on the gas”; the acceleration force on

the rear tire is pressing the splice together, rather than peeling it back.

As for braking, 80 % of the braking should take place in the front on most bikes. Therefore, the

front tread splice is run in the opposite direction than that of the rear, so when the rider is on

the brakes, he’s not peeling the tread splice back.

If you are using a tire that has a directional arrow for rear rotation only and for some reason you

want to put it on the front, make sure it is rotating in the opposite direction so you don’t

aggravate the tread splice.

Avon Tyres.

http://www.cyrilhuzeblog.com/2009/08...by-avon-tyres/

 

 

http://i382.photobucket.com/albums/oo265/kj5ix/Tech%20Tips/triearrows.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it was Condor ask the question "Why mount a rear tire on the front anyway?

 

I also would like to know...

 

Is/does the rear tire have more tread allowing one to get better life out of it?

 

Or is there some other reason?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I believe it was Condor ask the question "Why mount a rear tire on the front anyway?

 

I also would like to know...

 

Is/does the rear tire have more tread allowing one to get better life out of it?

 

Or is there some other reason?

 

 

Yes, I mounted a Metzler on my front and I believe I have 4/32's more tread depth.

I have done this in the past with no issues whatsoever. Like someone mentioned. It used to be whatever fit went on the bike. There was no front or rear that we recognized in my younger days.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...

Absolutely!

I had an old timer motorcycle mechanic tell me that front and rear motorcycle tires used to be one and the same thing, and the tire would have an arrow pointing one way for front usage and another arrow pointing the other way for rear usage.

 

Compare the direction of the tread patterns of a front tire and a rear tire and you'll find that the tread patterns run opposite of each other. When a rear tire is used on the front, the tire needs to be reversed so that the tread pattern runs the correct direction, the same as a front tire would run, and whoever mounts it by the arrow mounts it backwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Curious... Why would someone put a tire designed for the rear on the front except in a pinch where no fronts were available?? :confused07:

 

I believe it was Condor ask the question "Why mount a rear tire on the front anyway?

 

I also would like to know...

 

Is/does the rear tire have more tread allowing one to get better life out of it?

 

Or is there some other reason?

 

Two reasons

 

1. A rear tire has a higher load rating.

2. A rear tire has more tread depth so lasts longer on the front than a regular front tire would.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...