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  • Posts

    • But don’t most rear tires have directional markings?   That article states that tires with directional markings are assembled with the tread cut at an angle so that the thrust pushes the splice together.  If you mount it in reverse rotation, any thrust would be opposite of what it should be.  It’s not the driven tire so there would be less thrust but even friction would create some. 

    • In general regardless of vehicle, tires can rotate in either direction. The exception here are tires designed specifically for the rear of a motorcycle or have directional markings on the  sidewalls. Now something to consider with the way the plys are layed in a tire it has more to do with the thrust forces placed on the tire than which direction the tire rolls. A tire that pushes as in a rear tire has the opposite thrust force than a tire that is pushed as in a front tire. For that reason if you did mount a rear tire on the front the proper way to mount it would be in reverse rotation. The tread pattern is also a consideration as the rear tires pattern would be designed for displacing water while pushing were as the front tire would be designed to displace water while being pushed/coasting.

      Edited by saddlebum
    • Well, I did a bit of research on this issue and found that manufacturers do not recommend running a tire backwards.  Due to the angle of the splice of the tread, it can cause the tire to come apart.  At least that is what the one article that I found states.  Here is is for anybody wanting to read about it.

      https://motorbiketireshop.com/biker-news/why-are-motorcycle-front-tires-backwards

    • I know that Michelin does not make the Commander III in the 150 size for the front.  They do make a Commander III 150/80B16 for the rear though.  So I am thinking about just using it and turning it backwards.    My question is about the manufacturing of tires.  I haven no basic for this at all it's just. a question that keeps popping into my mind.  When a rear tire is manufactured, I wonder if the way they lay the inner plies and etc. is designed to rotate in the specific direction for the rear.  If you turn it around backwards and run it on the front, could that cause delamination or the plies to separate because it wasn't designed to run in that direction?  

    • 2 minutes ago, Woody said:

      you get a lot more miles, most have a flatter contact patch on the road. reversing it put the carcus plies in the correct direction in order to make the tire stronger and not separate. When the tire is used on the rear most of forces on the tire are on acceleration and when it is on the front most of the forces come from braking. 

      Ah, it's a trike thing. I hadn't twigged to the three wheeled subject matter. I was thinking this might be a "Dark Side" thing.

       

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