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Thinking about buying an aluminum trailer


uncledj
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On 5/28/2021 at 5:32 PM, uncledj said:

The members I've met know that when Lisa and I attend events or rallies, we usually drive the motor home and trailer the bike.   I'm thinking about getting an aluminum trailer, (open) and going a bit larger to carry two bikes in case I want to bring friends along.

I can get a 6'4" x 12' for neighborhood of $3000.   

Comparable traditional steel trailer sells for neighborhood of $1700.

The aluminum is attractive because I can move it around a lot easier, whereas to shuttle the steel trailer around typically requires that I hook it up to my 4 wheeler.

I'm leaning towards aluminum, but am wondering how durable they are, and if an aluminum deck would be slippery.  

I also wonder if I can build bulletproof tie down points on an aluminum trailer.

Thoughts???   Opinions???

That would be a handy unit , and about the right size ..I built a steel trailer that size 6 years ago , I found that when  loading.. 2.. 800 bikes onto it a little S10 V6 truck is to light a vehicle to do the pulling , becomes unsafe in the corners on the highway and you will need brakes on the trailer ....Keep it as close to the ground as you can for easy loading ..Build a strong hitch for safety reasons  ...A 180 amp Mig will do the job in either aluminum or steel , only problem the aluminum conversion on the Mig is costly 

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Posted (edited)

The only question on the 2000 lbs, is that the rating for each or for the "SET" of 4.

Only make the recess just deep enough. You want to leave as much wood as possible.

You will want to use bolts and nuts to attach them.

I would make a steel plate bigger than the recess hole to put on the bottom side with bolts going thru.

Based on the dimensions they give, your recess hole will be about 4 inch Dia and a bit OVER 1 Inch deep. That does not leave much wood if the floor is 2x6 or even 2 x 8.

Also make sure that the wood is very well attached to the trailer so that the bike and a piece of wood do not go flying if you have to stop or swerve fast, you know some jerk will cut you off or run a stop at some point.

The flatbed I had was 2 x 12 planks that were just under a small lip at the front and back, any load attached to the floor was realistically only held down by the 1 x 1 x 1/8 angle tack welded to the front and back of the trailer and the weight of the board the load was attached to.It was more like the boards were to be held down by the load.

Here is one that is stamped on the ring as 2000 lb and comes with a backing plate and carriage bolts so that the bolt heads are not as much of a trip hazard.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-Recessed-D-Ring-TieDown-Anchors-Mounting-Lock-Plates-Bolting-Accessories-/264816546110?vxp=mtr&hash=item3da84bd13e

Edited by Flyinfool
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Already ordered all the "stuff".   Stainless button head bolts for the heavy duty tie down points.   Planning on putting a hardwood plank beneath the bed for the bolts to go through.

The plank will extend perpendicular to the 2x8s, across the underside of the bed.   Bolts will go through the recessed hold down, the 2x8 and the hardwood plank.   Only 1/4' bolts, but 4 per hold down...Fender washers and nylon locknuts.

I also got a bunch of single hole tie downs to mount on the uprights for bungees and such.

Again, all stainless tie downs and bolts.

I'll send a pic when I git-er-dun.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/232241609909?var=531462564260

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Be aware that stainless steel screws are rated at 70,000 PSI tensile strength and the same screw in steel is rated 120,000 PSI.

1/4-20 has an effective dia of .201. That is only .0317 Sq IN. Stainless hardware looks pretty and is more expensive but is equivalent to cheap grade 2 hardware.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Flyinfool said:

Be aware that stainless steel screws are rated at 70,000 PSI tensile strength and the same screw in steel is rated 120,000 PSI.

1/4-20 has an effective dia of .201. That is only .0317 Sq IN. Stainless hardware looks pretty and is more expensive but is equivalent to cheap grade 2 hardware.

Good to know.  I use a LOT of stainless bolts/nuts/washers.  Where I live, EVERYTHING rusts, and I hate dealing with rusted bolts.

Did the math and it still comes out to 2200 pounds per bolt.

I typically tie the front down at 2 different points for each side, just as a safety measure.   I'm usually more concerned about the failure of a strap than failure of the attach point.

I don't know how that works, because I'm sure a 1/4" bolt won't support 2200 lbs.   I'd imagine it'd depend on the amount of thread surface between the nut / bolt.

I've wondered about the strength of the aluminum tie down points that came with the trailer.

Edited by uncledj
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Here is my aluminum sled trailer that I have setup to haul both my 2 wheel RSV & my wifes Hannigan RSV at the same time. The trailer is 21 foot x 101 inches wide. Hauls both with room to spare.  The only downside to this trailer is the deck height, I have to raise the nose of the trailer to reduce the breakover angle of the ramp or risk high centering the bikes when loading or unloading. I do this in a number of ways.

1) use the tongue jack.

2) run the rear wheels of the tow vehicle up on ramps.

3)  back up to a raised section of ground to reduce the ramp angle.

 

 

20210608_112659.jpg

20210608_112625.jpg

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1 hour ago, ragtop69gs said:

Here is my aluminum sled trailer that I have setup to haul both my 2 wheel RSV & my wifes Hannigan RSV at the same time. The trailer is 21 foot x 101 inches wide. Hauls both with room to spare.  The only downside to this trailer is the deck height, I have to raise the nose of the trailer to reduce the breakover angle of the ramp or risk high centering the bikes when loading or unloading. I do this in a number of ways.

1) use the tongue jack.

2) run the rear wheels of the tow vehicle up on ramps.

3)  back up to a raised section of ground to reduce the ramp angle.

 

 

20210608_112659.jpg

20210608_112625.jpg

Have you thought about using arched ramps. Also I guess you needed the extra room on the trailer for the cases of Apple Pie

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, saddlebum said:

Have you thought about using arched ramps. Also I guess you needed the extra room on the trailer for the cases of Apple Pie

With the ramp I have, it stores below the deck, with an arched ramp it would need to be stored on top of the the deck.

Apple Pie... what do you think the storage box up front is for?  Sorry, no Canadian deliveries! Justin has the border sealed !

Edited by ragtop69gs
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34 minutes ago, bpate4home said:

So to expand this to a smaller trailer setup to even a small hauler.  What about something like this The Original Slick Wheelie Motorcycle Hauler | The USA Trailer Store.  I need something to pull the bike along because the Wife cannot make long distance trips on it any more.

No good for the Venture  unless you want to tow it with the engine running in order to make sure the transmission is lubricated. Otherwise you could sustain transmission damage.

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2 minutes ago, saddlebum said:

No good for the Venture  unless you want to tow it with the engine running in order to make sure the transmission is lubricated. Otherwise you could sustain transmission damage.

Great to know Thanks.  I've got nowhere to store a regular trailer unless it is light enough to fold/stand up on my own. 

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My ex next door neighbor had a heavy duty looking trailer that folded up and stood upright on the side of his garage. It had small diameter wide tires on it.  I don't know the brand or cost but it was pretty neat.  Sadly, he passed a year or so ago at age 88.  

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Haven't put the anchor points on yet.  Waiting on the bolts...decided to go with 5/16.

I don't know that I'd feel comfortable using the factory tie down points for a heavy bike.

I do know that I'll feel comfortable with the anchor points I'll install.

20210609_185901_resized.jpg

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14 hours ago, uncledj said:

Haven't put the anchor points on yet.  Waiting on the bolts...decided to go with 5/16.

I don't know that I'd feel comfortable using the factory tie down points for a heavy bike.

I do know that I'll feel comfortable with the anchor points I'll install.

20210609_185901_resized.jpg

If that stated limit is per eye than you should be OK. provided they don't bend over under side pull tension. Some Aluminum alloys do not normally like to get bent as a rule.

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, bpate4home said:

Great to know Thanks.  I've got nowhere to store a regular trailer unless it is light enough to fold/stand up on my own. 

here are some interesting options:

 

Edited by saddlebum
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