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Laid the bike down - wrenched the knee


spartikus
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I've had the bike 2 weeks. Rode it around the block a few times as I am a new rider. Couple of buddies offer to take me out for a real ride (As I need to be accompanied by a fully licensed rider to be legal until I do my road test).

 

Great.. They show up, I promptly go to turn around and lay the bike down.. No big deal rookies do this and I have no problem admitting it. Here is the kicker, I watched several videos of guys explaining hwo to safely lay the bike down and get it back up again. Every single one of them says let the bike go. It's 800 lbs and when she's going shes going and thats that. So what did I do? Instinctively put my foot down to push back. I have bad knees and she just popped like a cork on a bottle of champagne new years eve.

 

I sucked it up and still went riding in excruciating pain. My knee is the size of a softball right now many hours later and several ice packs later.

 

The lesson here? When she's going she's going. Let her go. Bike didnt have a scratch and just sat on the pegs. My knee however? Not so robust.

 

Can't say it enough to new fellow riders. I know it's natural instinct to try and save the bike at low speeds or a standstill (which is what I basically was at) but don't. Break yourself of that instinct because your knees and legs are way more fragile than the 800 pound chunk of metal between your legs :)

 

Other than that was a beautiful ride.

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1st Gen is heavy and needs to be respected, but it really is about the most nibble ridding bike.

I dropped mine with my wife on the bike just backing up into a spot.

 

Your knee is another thing, the bike will never get lighter than that. "Ride like a Pro" on "you tube" is a great lesson to take up and practice.

 

Good luck with your knee.

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Sorry to hear about the knee, I don't think it's a real rookie mistake, but more instinct. You don't own it, til you drop it. But the knee...ouch heal fast and well my friend. and the key is not to make the same mistake twice.:stickpoke::stickpoke:

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When dropping a bike at 0 mph, you don't want to just let it go unless you want to end up replacing plastic. You don't want to fight it either, you're never going to stop it. It's more like guiding it down to rest, and really doesn't put a whole lot of pressure on the left leg or the knee. Don't ask me how I know that....:whistling:

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Hate to be a negatoid but you did pick a big scoot to learn on. Very happy with my Tour Deluxe but it doesn't handle or stop nearly as well as my lighter V-Strom. It wasn't wise but I learned how to ride back in the 60's on one of the biggest production motorcycles available, it was a 650cc. Hope the knee comes around. :080402gudl_prv:

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I've dropped mine a few times, turning or parking. Slow speeds or stops are when it happens. Riding a light bike teaches you that you can stop a drop by putting your foot down. Turning requires a light touch, keeping your speed up with a constant throttle while using the clutch to feather your speed through the turn. It's hard to unlearn the habit of putting your foot down, though. Ventures are designed to sit on the pegs & crash bars. I've been in the situation where the bike leaned on my foot (which was planted on the ground) in the garage or at a gas stop. It's tough to climb off without breaking your ankle.

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I don't mean to offend you but the biggest lesson h ere I believe is that a beginner should start riding on a small light weight bike. After many thousand miles maybe you will be ready for an 800 lb bike.

 

Hate to be a negatoid but you did pick a big scoot to learn on. Very happy with my Tour Deluxe but it doesn't handle or stop nearly as well as my lighter V-Strom. It wasn't wise but I learned how to ride back in the 60's on one of the biggest production motorcycles available, it was a 650cc. Hope the knee comes around. :080402gudl_prv:

 

All though there is much wisdom in starting with a lighter bike the fact is there are also differences. In most cases when a lighter biker starts to go over on you, its possible to stop it. Getting into that habit is just what you do not want to do with a heavier bike. So chances are he would still have tried to stop the bike from going over. Main thing a lesson was learned without major injury. We have all been there.

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There is so much to learn when first starting to ride. When the clutch, throttle, brakes, balancing, turning, operating the turn signals, etc. all become second nature, then it's time to move up if you want. Trying to do all that while balancing a big bike at slow speeds is so much more difficult when you first start riding. It's a recipe for disaster.

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Made it to the first stop sign the day I got mine and it started to go. Instead of letting it go like I should have, I planted my leg and pulled like hell to keep it from going down. I'm not small at all and have spent a lot of time in the gym which is why I was able to keep it from going down but I was rewarded with a messed up back for about 2 weeks. Lesson learned, let her go, it hurts less.

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Hope the knee is doing better Sparti!! Sounds like you learned lesson No. 1 when dealing with these big ol heavy bikes,,, when a fight breaks out between gravity and your bike let them figure out who wins... :backinmyday:

I know when I am bruised up and have to sit still I love to read cheerful motorcycle related storys. In that spirit, here is a true story that happened to my cousin and I while riding our bikes out to California a number years ago.. He was a newbie at the time, I had many miles of ride time and should have known better..

We pulled into a fuel station near Bodaga Bay, Chip on his 1100 Virago, me on my Blonde 84.. After filling his bike he rolled it over beside me and pointed to the tank. Fuel was leaking out around the gas cap and he couldnt get it to stop. I told him he over filled it in the heat.. I suggested leaning it down a little and letting it flow for minute.. I leaned out to hold the left grip of his bike while balancing my fully packed Venture between my legs, he held my right grip to steady his lean,, instantly we were on the ground with both of us trapped between our bikes:rotf:

People were walking past a tangled up mess consisting of two fully packed motorcycles trying to press two grown men into the concrete.. I know they saw us cause they were pointing at us and laughing but no one offered to come help.. I looked at my cousin and said "I think they think its The Chip and Scott Comedy Hour or something",, the laughter helped the pain A LOT for both of us!!:rotf:

Its not IF my friend, its WHEN..:detective:

Puc

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  • 2 weeks later...

Heal up fast! I'm not gonna tell you that a big first bike is a terrible idea, because my '83 is my first bike. That said, you gotta be damned careful and take it slooooow. Within my first month, I managed to lose control at low speed and when I went to dive off the bike pulled me into a split and I didn't walk straight for days. I've dropped her since then. Never get cocky, and take things slow and easy until you get things smoothed out.

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  • 2 years later...

Well this thread is over 2 years so I can only assume that the knee has healed up for Spartikus but I wanted to comment on some of the suggestions that he should have started out on a smaller bike.

 

I was bitten by the bike bug during this past summer, booked into the RTI course in my area which consists of a 4 hour theory class and then 16 hours of on the bike training that weekend, trained on a little Suzuki Cruiser 350 I think, learned a lot especially slow speed maneuvers, since I had close to zero previous experience I had no bad habits to break. Passed the course and then went out bike shopping. Had plenty of advice on what size bike I should start with but since the idea of getting the bike was to go 2up touring with the misses a small bike seemed like a waste, learn how to ride the small bike, then buy a big bike and then learn how to ride it, not to mention forking out for two bikes in short order, I decided to go big or stay home.

 

First week of September I picked up an 08 Venture, a lot of empty parking lot practice with some guidance from the Ride Like A Pro DVD series and I am happy to say that I put over 4500 kms on the Venture between September and my last ride of 2016 on November 29th. Set my baby down a grand total 4 times that first week, first time because I forgot the kickstand, other 3 during slow speed turns before I had got the hang of the friction zone and feathering the throttle, all instances in an empty parking lot with no damage to the bike. Was I nervous at first, hell yes, but I don't think I would have been any less nervous on a smaller bike. I spent at least 15 hours and many miles over the fist few weeks in that empty parking lot until I felt confident riding the Venture slow and smooth. After upgrading to my M2 at the end of October it was back to that parking lot this time to practice 2up, glad I did, passenger took a few turns around that parking lot before she got used to just how far that puppy can lean and still stay up.

 

Oh, there was this one embarrassing incident where a u-turn on a dead end gravel road while following a couple of buddies of mine did not work out so well, they were both amazed at how quick I picked her back up, told them I had had a bit of practice picking her up the past few weeks, never let the Venture nap for too long if I can help it.

 

Go big or stay home may not be for everyone for a first bike but so far it has worked out for me, mind you I am not a small lad, 6 foot and about 210, but other than balancing the bike at a stop the Venture does most of the heavy lifting on its own.

 

It has only been 5 weeks since I parked her for the winter and I can't wait for the spring to hit the road again.

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It has only been 5 weeks since I parked her for the winter and I can't wait for the spring to hit the road again.

 

Word of advice I do have for this. Practice when you get it back out again. You won't believe the difference a couple - few months can be. It's not that you forget how to ride it or anything it is just the beheamath of the beast!! Thought I was done Dumping my bike and hadn't road in a couple of months, Plus the fact it was on chat which I have never got along with. The chat usually wins I made the mistake of squeezing that front brake when I thought a car was going to continue going straight and they turned where I was. The bike fell and the first time I had ever Witness it coming down all the way over like @Flyinfool tried to tell me it would.

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When I dropped mine it was at a gas station. Wife likes to stay on the pillion when I fuel. I get back on the bike and 1\2 way through bringing up the kick stand my wife wiggled left and with my left foot in the air bike just dropped. The funny part was me telling her to get off the bike and she says" I am holding it up for you " I almost pee'd my pants laughing so hard. When I composed my self I told her the bike is on the ground and she is not holding it up. She was so surprised they her leaning off the side of the saddle wasn't holding up 900 pounds. Still makes me chuckle.

VentureFar ...

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I'm sure I fessed up to this one long ago but when I got my 1st Venture I had only been riding about 30 yrs or so . DROPPED it TWICE The 1st time I rode it!!! Pulled into drive after a long ride started to back up and down I went!!! Picked it up and dropped it on the other side!!

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I don't mean to offend you but the biggest lesson here I believe is that a beginner should start riding on a small light weight bike. After many thousand miles maybe you will be ready for an 800 lb bike.

 

I disagree, I started on a 87 Venture Royale after 36 years of not riding. If you work your way up you still will have a learning curve when you get on the heavy bike. Might as well get it over with up front.

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I'm sure I fessed up to this one long ago but when I got my 1st Venture I had only been riding about 30 yrs or so . DROPPED it TWICE The 1st time I rode it!!! Pulled into drive after a long ride started to back up and down I went!!! Picked it up and dropped it on the other side!!

 

We've all dropped them, truth be known. Nothing to be shamed of.

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There is so much to learn when first starting to ride. When the clutch, throttle, brakes, balancing, turning, operating the turn signals, etc. all become second nature, then it's time to move up if you want. Trying to do all that while balancing a big bike at slow speeds is so much more difficult when you first start riding. It's a recipe for disaster.

Riding a motorcycle is like Conducting a Symphony.

 

Hope you heal fast

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Riding a motorcycle is like Conducting a Symphony.

 

Hope you heal fast

 

Damn I been doing it all wrong, I didn't know you was a Conductor.:Avatars_Gee_George: I would have figured more of mechanic with AC/DC blaring in the background. Not someone with tweezers and razors cutting a patient open to Beethoven, However I can stand some Beethoven and Bach. That 80's dentist music Sucked. LOL

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