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Little Ride on the Trike


Freebird
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Took the trike out for a little ride yesterday.  Though I certainly know better, I had not checked the tire pressure since buying it.  Having sat for about a year before I purchased it, I knew better.  So I checked the tire pressure before taking it out yesterday and all three were VERY low.  Rear tires had about 14 lbs in them and the front about 24 lbs.   Aired them up to the proper recommendations and it was amazing how much better it handled.  Even the vast majority of the headshake that I had experienced was gone.  

I was cruising happily down the road when I started loosing power.  A quick glance at the gas gauge showed that I was on empty.  Having gotten used to fuel injection, I momentarily forgot that I had a "reserve".  I hadn't ever used the aux tank before so I just reached over and hit the switch and waited as the bars increased on my gas gauge.  I never had to pull over, the bike almost immediately regained power and I continued riding and let it fill from the aux tank until it was about 1 bar from full.  I know that you can overflow the main tank if you don't pay attention.  It worked amazingly well and I am very happy with it.  

Otherwise, it was a short but enjoyable ride.  

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Did you have the wife on board? the last time you had the bad head shake she was with you so that could have made a difference and no you don't have to tell her I said that. My in-laws trike does it mainly after hitting a bump at slow speeds but I think it's his front tire  

Edited by Woody
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I am talking with a fellow that has a 06 Venture he triked out with a Hannigan kit in 12.  He had the front rake changed and said it handles wonderfully.  I feel the price is right and the wife is very much for it.  I will be keeping up with your progress Freebird to see how it is going with you.  

I have a question though.  Has anyone ever put a car tire on the front of a trike?  I like the idea of the high milage tire but am not sure if it is viable.  

Steve

Edited by Steve S
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I know that Michelin does not make the Commander III in the 150 size for the front.  They do make a Commander III 150/80B16 for the rear though.  So I am thinking about just using it and turning it backwards.    My question is about the manufacturing of tires.  I haven no basic for this at all it's just. a question that keeps popping into my mind.  When a rear tire is manufactured, I wonder if the way they lay the inner plies and etc. is designed to rotate in the specific direction for the rear.  If you turn it around backwards and run it on the front, could that cause delamination or the plies to separate because it wasn't designed to run in that direction?  

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Well, I did a bit of research on this issue and found that manufacturers do not recommend running a tire backwards.  Due to the angle of the splice of the tread, it can cause the tire to come apart.  At least that is what the one article that I found states.  Here is is for anybody wanting to read about it.

https://motorbiketireshop.com/biker-news/why-are-motorcycle-front-tires-backwards

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In general regardless of vehicle, tires can rotate in either direction. The exception here are tires designed specifically for the rear of a motorcycle or have directional markings on the  sidewalls. Now something to consider with the way the plys are layed in a tire it has more to do with the thrust forces placed on the tire than which direction the tire rolls. A tire that pushes as in a rear tire has the opposite thrust force than a tire that is pushed as in a front tire. For that reason if you did mount a rear tire on the front the proper way to mount it would be in reverse rotation. The tread pattern is also a consideration as the rear tires pattern would be designed for displacing water while pushing were as the front tire would be designed to displace water while being pushed/coasting.

Edited by saddlebum
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But don’t most rear tires have directional markings?   That article states that tires with directional markings are assembled with the tread cut at an angle so that the thrust pushes the splice together.  If you mount it in reverse rotation, any thrust would be opposite of what it should be.  It’s not the driven tire so there would be less thrust but even friction would create some. 

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On 9/25/2022 at 9:48 AM, Freebird said:

But don’t most rear tires have directional markings?   That article states that tires with directional markings are assembled with the tread cut at an angle so that the thrust pushes the splice together.  If you mount it in reverse rotation, any thrust would be opposite of what it should be.  It’s not the driven tire so there would be less thrust but even friction would create some. 

That is correct. But as stated the thrust forces on the rear or driving tire comes from acceleration or pushing if you will, were the thrust forces placed on the front tire is the opposite it comes from being pushed rather than pushing such braking or simple rolling resistance and the reason for mounting it in reverse rotation.  

Edited by saddlebum
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