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What’s your #1 tip for a multi day trip?


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Back in my 20’s I could pack for a weekend inside the underseat and surrounding space of my sport bike, sometimes a backpack as well  and always a cargo net bungie to pick up a case of brew once nearing the destination.  Most always I was with a few other riders hitting up my buddies beach house or where others had driven their cage so I didn’t have to rely on bike only transportation, and if something went wrong I had backup.  March 2020 I got my 87VR because of a planned weekend trip in May but it got cancelled.  This summer I want to embark on my first real touring trip but have never done so.  I may have a passenger, might have some riding mates, might go it alone.  Something probably similar to this route, modified maybe.
 

 

https://www.eaglerider.com/self-drive-motorcycle-tours/utah-motorcycle-tour

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I have found a good, modern day touring jacket, like something our friend @VentureFar has written about for Ultimate, pretty much covers all the rain gear needs for those folks who require rain protec

Back in November my wife and I took a 4 day trip to the FL Keys.  We actually fit everything in the saddlebags, trunk and extra bag on the luggage rack.  The trailer was full of fishing gear.  I was i

Certainly a lot of info! To add to my 1st post: Frog's Toggs. I got the heavier pants but the lightweight top. Came in handy when a cold front came through visiting @Flyinfool's house. Made

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Have some water along to drink as it get hot and dry out that way.  I also found out that any fasteners that you have changed on your bike, make sure you have the tools along to remove them incase you need to get to something behind those items.

Rick F.

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2 minutes ago, cimmer said:
16 minutes ago, Pasta Burner said:

Back in my 20’s I could pack for a weekend inside the underseat and surrounding space of my sport bike, sometimes a backpack as well  and always a cargo net bungie to pick up a case of brew once nearing the destination.  Most always I was with a few other riders hitting up my buddies beach house or where others had driven their cage so I didn’t have to rely on bike only transportation, and if something went wrong I had backup.  March 2020 I got my 87VR because of a planned weekend trip in May but it got cancelled.  This summer I want to embark on my first real touring trip but have never done so.  I may have a passenger, might have some riding mates, might go it alone.  Something probably similar to this route, modified maybe.
 

 

https://www.eaglerider.com/self-drive-motorcycle-tours/utah-motorcycle-tour

Be prepared.

Pack efficiently.

Take your time.

Eat, sleep and rest. 

Enjoy.

I did 4K miles in 3 weeks...3 years ago. Loved it.

 

 

20180604_085540.jpg

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6 minutes ago, cimmer said:

Have some water along to drink as it get hot and dry out that way.  I also found out that any fasteners that you have changed on your bike, make sure you have the tools along to remove them incase you need to get to something behind those items.

Rick F.

Thanks, yea I’m fairly familiar with the climate and will be bringing one of my camelbacks out of storage.  Should be doing that anyways.  Earlier I started watching Puc’s recent video on a tool kit but stopped knowing I’d need to rewatch while making a list.  I started a tool kit already for everyday carry.

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9 minutes ago, videoarizona said:

 

20180604_085540.jpg

Nice pic!  I’m an Eagle Scout and have done a fair amount of backcountry backpacking.  I sort of feel this is very similar in concept.  Now to sort through all the cobwebs blocking experience past.

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Best take your bike, that would be tops on the list, then my mother always said to take clean underwear, so I would add that. Later in life I also learned that a pillow and something soft to lay on would be a nice addition. Also I learned, and many others would back me on this, if you take a passenger and that person happens to be female, get a trailer!! Other than that, I'm READY!!

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Riding alone, with a passenger, and with riding mates----------------------each one 100% different from each other.

First I'd say to figure out which one it is then take some shorter trips before you embark on that big trip.

 

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I camp mostly when I travel so I pack like I would when I go on a backpacking trip in the wilderness, other than that I usually eat at restaurants, so I cut down on the food I carry and  just keep a few non perishables or freeze dried meals  in case I cannot find some place to eat. I carry an aeropress coffee maker. see https://aeropress.com/ some coffee makings and water. Often I include a backpackers water filtering system my top choice is platypus see https://www.platy.com/ca in case I either need to get water from a stream, lake or camp ground. often camp grounds have water sources that state not for drinking but the platypus will make that water safe to drink, or just don't trust the quality of the water from some wells. It comes in various capacities and you can get adapters to fill most any hydration pack or bottles directly. I avoid cotton preferring clothes made of fast drying material  such as polyester or nylon trust me you will appreciate it. BTW nylon is pretty tough in case of a fall. Also something for warmth, merino wool is best choice it drys relatively well when wet and better yet it still insulates even when wet unlike down which as nice as it is loose all insulating value if it gets wet. And of course good rain gear

A good all round tool including wire tape and connectors. though I am not usually a fan of insulated butt connectors they are a great quick way of getting you out of trouble. try to keep tool kit small but efficient and a small but effective compressor or tire pump. You may also want to include a set of tire irons. I also always carry a plug kit, though it is not generally approved to plug a motor cycle tire it can get you to somewhere where a proper repair can be made. My personal favorite, is tech permacure tire plugs. I have used these for 40 years on everything from small trailers to transport trucks without any follow up repair, even put as many as three in one hole and never had a failure for the tires life span. The guy that supplied me would demonstrate by jamming one in the sidewall of his front tire. By the time he wore out that tire he had 250 of them in the tire. Definitely not an approved demonstration technique  but very effective just the same. Later you can The kit I carry is for personal use is this https://products.techtirerepairs.com/tire-repair-materials/tire-repair-kits/tech-outdoors/

 

 

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@Marcarl nailed it. We’ve done the 3day trips with just the saddlebags and trunk ok, longer trips I want more tools, cooler, leathers, rain gear, snacks etc, etc. The trailer is one of my best purchases, as we get older theres cpap machines, meds, and other necessities. On the other hand. watch @cowpuc and his videos, nobody packs a bike better for two people and weeks of travel. 

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3 hours ago, eagleeye said:

Riding alone, with a passenger, and with riding mates----------------------each one 100% different from each other.

First I'd say to figure out which one it is then take some shorter trips before you embark on that big trip.

 

All very true. This is just an idea that I want to carry out.  Haven’t talked about it with the wife or anyone else yet. That trip was just something I came across while googling.  The nice thing for me about that route is at any point I’m no more than six hours from home.  And can easily modify it into smaller chunks like you suggest.

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28 minutes ago, Condor said:

#1 A roll of toilet paper for emergencies, and hope you never have to use it

This hits home and is so true.  I always have TP in my carry on.  And growing up my dad always had a roll of TP in a coffee can with some sanitizer behind the seat.  When I turned 16 I started to carry my own coffee can and have one in every vehicle.  It took 25 years of having that insurance behind the seat, but when the time came to cash in on my investment it payed off in Spades!

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23 hours ago, Pasta Burner said:

Back in my 20’s I could pack for a weekend inside the underseat and surrounding space of my sport bike, sometimes a backpack as well  and always a cargo net bungie to pick up a case of brew once nearing the destination.  Most always I was with a few other riders hitting up my buddies beach house or where others had driven their cage so I didn’t have to rely on bike only transportation, and if something went wrong I had backup.  March 2020 I got my 87VR because of a planned weekend trip in May but it got cancelled.  This summer I want to embark on my first real touring trip but have never done so.  I may have a passenger, might have some riding mates, might go it alone.  Something probably similar to this route, modified maybe.
 

 

https://www.eaglerider.com/self-drive-motorcycle-tours/utah-motorcycle-tour

Don't overplan your route, allow yourself to change it up on the fly.  Don't insist on a set daily destination; if you tire, find a place to stay, if you feel good, keep going.

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Back in November my wife and I took a 4 day trip to the FL Keys.  We actually fit everything in the saddlebags, trunk and extra bag on the luggage rack.  The trailer was full of fishing gear.  I was impressed that fully loaded, two up and pulling a trailer the RSV was able to cruise down the Turnpike at 80+ mph like the trailer wasn't even there.

 

IMG_20201124_113539.jpg

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22 hours ago, Popsnana19655 said:

received_2575813512732704.thumb.jpeg.42220cd9bffe82721d292da7bcb46440.jpegthis is the way to load a bike properly. You only get to use one rope to tie it down. 

Yes but the Puc still has room for two passengers.

IMG_20140728_161814_412.thumb.jpg.a3e2b58678cd6fb22d8da7865424eee2.jpg

 

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For me on this side of USA, Rain Gear. I'm also a firm believer of the vacuum type bags to pack clothes in. They compress and keep stuff dry.  First pic here of RSV is what I had to pack when I went to Daytona to work as an official. I was up there for 3 weeks. Uniforms, rain gear, warm clothes, and 3 firesuits. Second one is 07 or 08 when wife and I went to NC for a week in Fall.

 

Loaded for a trip.jpg

IMG_0513.jpg

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Good question, wife says most important to get off the steed, stretch and rehydrate every couple of hours. Myself, a full selection of tools and a cell with wifi/data.   60 day rte66 run was longest  for us in 2013, 267 hours saddle time.

This forum was the best reference to successfully put that trip together. 

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10 hours ago, djh3 said:

For me on this side of USA, Rain Gear. I'm also a firm believer of the vacuum type bags to pack clothes in. They compress and keep stuff dry.

Personally I prefer the  compression dry sacks, I use when backpacking. The one I keep my sleeping gear in, also doubles as an air mattress in-flatter. It has a valve on it which connects to my air mattress so I can inflate it by squeezing trapped air from it into my air mattress. Saves my lungs and the air is dry instead of moist.

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Plan for the unexpected which includes a lot, including the weather all the way to a flat tire.   

MORE:  Leave with good tires. Take tools you can use.  Invest is a SPOT or similar for emergency if no cell service.  Med Jet is great if you and/or you motorcycle need to be evacuated for any reason.  I had to use it.  If traveling outside USA obtain some hospital insurance that will pay the facility, not you pay and pray you are reimbursed (happened to me).  GoreTex is you friend.  Be very aware of the range of your motorcycle in a worse case and have a good idea where you will get your next fill.  Yep, early on I found out about range.  Use water proof bags to pack your clothes in even if you think your luggage is waterproof.    

But most importantly, enjoy it.    

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5 hours ago, leroy said:

Be very aware of the range of your motorcycle in a worse case and have a good idea where you will get your next fill.

Notice the gas can strapped to the trailer tongue in the pic I posted above.  I brought it as insurance......and actually did have to use it once on the trip.  We took back roads on the way down and gas stations got a little sparse.

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