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Took a crack at a jack adapter...


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So I got tired of working on my RSTD on the ground, and had seen some of these adapters floating around, and even seen some for sale on eBay, but figured I could whip it up in the garage while my 3 year old was napping.

 

Materials:

45" of 1 1/4" square steel tubing (left over from another project)

26" of cold rolled steel angle 1 1/4" each side

1 package of JB Weld (yep I'm being lazy)

 

Setup:

Step1: Measure 2x then cut the square rail in 4 pieces.

2 pieces 19" long for the side rails.

2 pieces 3" long for the rear lifts.

Measure 2x then cut the angle iron into 2 pieces.

14" and 12"

 

Step 2:

Mark on the inside of the angle iron, for the placement of the long square rails, rails should be 11" from outside edge to outside edge, equal distance from the ends for each rail (centered?) See picture to see what I mean.

 

Step 3: pick your favorite welding method.

Since I had JB Weld sitting around, and the fun square rail I had available for this project would have produced some nasty vapors if I arc welded, I used the JB Weld... (And yes that is one of the reasons my buddies nicked me JB)

 

Weld the long rails to the inside of the angle iron as shown in pics, and how you should have marked out by now.

 

Step 4: if using JB Weld - wait 5 hrs till partially set.

 

All types continue and turn over to set the short blocks even with the ends of the 12" angle iron, crossing perpendicular to the long rails. Weld in place.

 

Now after waiting 24 hrs for JB Weld to fully cure, or immediately if you used traditional welding, you can use a rasp or grinder to clean up the sharp edges.

 

This fixture will now sit under the RSTD or Venture (or several other Mamma Yama bikes that have low engine cases) with the wider section toward the front, seating at the point that the front floorboards are connecting down to the frame, with the long rails close enough together that they catch even the cheap black widow bike Jack's, and the back shorter crossbar with the short blocks on top will contact the frame just behind the welded on eye slots from the factory.

This lifts it away along the bikes rails, and keeps it from hitting the kickstand, and the long rails separation keeps away from our bikes soft underbelly.

Yay! Now I just need to get it all shaved down so it won't cut me, and I'm liable to spray it over with lineX to keep it nice.

 

Images to follow tomorrow after I load them to my laptop because apparently the site doesn't like me doing this from my phone.

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I don't know if I would trust JB Weld to hold 1000 lbs over my head. If a joint popped off it would get real ugly real fast. It is not just the weight of the bike on those joints. it is also any forces that you are applying to a wrench. Then the legs are a foot long lever to put even more stress on the joints.

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As a "see if it fits" maybe OK. But I would either weld it or get it welded or bolt it together. I built one for my RSV years back. I now use it for my Victory with a couple other modifications. I surely wouldnt trust my life to epoxy joints

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dbtgallery.php?do=gallery_image&id=28829&gal=gallery&type=full dbtgallery.php?do=gallery_image&id=28827&gal=gallery&type=full

 

 

Yes I know that regular welds are stronger than JB weld - but as I no longer own an arc welder or acetylene welder any longer I needed to get it together to change a tire - so JB weld it is (for now). I will probably bolt it, grind it, and take it to a shop to have them put some nice welds on it before coating it with LineX. However - JB weld (properly mixed and set) has a strength of 3690 lbf/in2 - with placement of the angle iron over which will have the bike resting over top of the lifting bars resting on the jack, the only questionable torque point is the rear 3" lifter welds - where I would put the first set of bolts as soon as I have time to stop by the hardware store and get a good metal bit for my drill if i don't get to have it welded for me somewhere - but even then downforce of the bike should mostly be on the steel rather than the weld with it properly strapped with this configuration. Mostly was doing this way to get it together and change a tire. As always will have my bike ratchet strapped down, which should also help to keep downforce on my side for the first use before its properly finnished for the long term.

Edited by JBeierDC
got pic to work
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https://www.venturerider.org/forum/dbtgallery.php?do=gallery_image&id=28829&gal=gallery&type=full https://www.venturerider.org/forum/dbtgallery.php?do=gallery_image&id=28827&gal=gallery&type=full

 

 

Yes I know that regular welds are stronger than JB weld - but as I no longer own an arc welder or acetylene welder any longer I needed to get it together to change a tire - so JB weld it is (for now). I will probably bolt it, grind it, and take it to a shop to have them put some nice welds on it before coating it with LineX. However - JB weld (properly mixed and set) has a strength of 3690 lbf/in2 - with placement of the angle iron over which will have the bike resting over top of the lifting bars resting on the jack, the only questionable torque point is the rear 3" lifter welds - where I would put the first set of bolts as soon as I have time to stop by the hardware store and get a good metal bit for my drill if i don't get to have it welded for me somewhere - but even then downforce of the bike should mostly be on the steel rather than the weld with it properly strapped with this configuration. Mostly was doing this way to get it together and change a tire. As always will have my bike ratchet strapped down, which should also help to keep downforce on my side for the first use before its properly finnished for the long term.

 

Okay my visualization receptor must not be working today. How does this adaptor to a jack? And what kind of Jack do you need?:confused07:

 

Thanks!

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You use a motorcycle/ATV jack. Has two arms/legs (skids) but if you get one look for one that is fairly wide and the arms fairly long. Some motorcycle jacks barely fit under the bike. I bought an OTC 1545 lift which has 17" skids. Keep in mind that the lift needs to have a 1,000 lb plus capacity.

https://www.amazon.ca/OTC-1545-Stinger-Motorcyle-Lift/dp/B000OCHCIW?tag=vglnk-ca-c976-20

 

The one that Carbon One made has a bracket that you use with a rod to fasten the lift to where a centre stand would mount to the bike. Look underneath and you'll see it. The front is raised to get around the exhaust. Fasten the adapter to the bike, then put the lift under and raise the bike. The bike will remain straight upright. Larry's adapter was made so you could fasten legs to the adapter - to be able to remove the lift and get it out of the way when working on the bike, and for storing the bike over the off-season.

https://www.venturerider.org/forum/showthread.php?142501-2nd-Gen-Lift-Adapter

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