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Now officially a gentleman farmer


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Well kinda,

Not really planning on farming but, it feels like I just bought a farm, albeit a small farm. Over the past three years I've been renting with option to buy my little twenty acres of Paradise and home. The clock was running out on my lease. I was forced the make a decision to buy or move by the end of the year.

 

I could bought a bigger and newer house for less money but not with the acreage. Considering moving was the last thing I wanted to do and the fact I love the privacy and seclusion on my little private hunting preserve I bit the bullet and bought the place. Closing was yesterday so it is officially now mine.....and the mortgage company's.

 

I have decided to name the place, Paradise Ranchero Hacienda or maybe Bob's Hunting Club for short.

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Congrats on the home.

 

So hunting season for us Ventureriders is when? Lol Seriously, I do need somewhere and someone to teach Mike hunting and all the rules. Legally I shouldn't. He wants to take up bow hunting, which I said was fine if he understood the work and expense involved. I don't think he does.

 

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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Congrats on your purchase! :happy65:Sounds like you've had plenty of time to decide whether you like it or not! LOL

So hopefully you'll continue to be very happy there & enjoy your privacy. I had 10A in the UK, & loved that it was on the edge of town for work & all but a thousand miles away in most other respects. we're considering downsizing (not really by choice) & the thought of moving, packing & finding a new place scares the hell out of me! Be Happy!

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Congrats on the home.

 

So hunting season for us Ventureriders is when? Lol Seriously, I do need somewhere and someone to teach Mike hunting and all the rules. Legally I shouldn't. He wants to take up bow hunting, which I said was fine if he understood the work and expense involved. I don't think he does.

 

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

I don't bow hunt anymore for this reason. There is a greater chance that you will wound and not retrieve the deer with archery than gun hunting. I only kill one or two a year for the freezer and no longer hunt for the sport value. Granted bow hunting is more of a sport but for eating purposes guns are more efficient.

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I no longer hunt for the sport value. Granted bow hunting is more of a sport but for eating purposes guns are more efficient.

 

Congratulations on the Gentleman Farm Bob. Now, how long does it take to cut up the Dragons? How many do you need to get through the Winter?:scratchchin:

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I don't bow hunt anymore for this reason. There is a greater chance that you will wound and not retrieve the deer with archery than gun hunting. I only kill one or two a year for the freezer and no longer hunt for the sport value. Granted bow hunting is more of a sport but for eating purposes guns are more efficient.

I'm well aware guns are better. His argument was guns give hunters an unfair advantage. I know what it's like to sit in a stand on a cold December morning. I want meat in my freezer. The does I have been seeing in my yard are so small it's sad. They barely stand to my midchest and I'm 5'6". Nah, the herds need to be thinned out. About ready to get a crossbow and start shooting them in my yard because they are plentiful. I can't shoot firearms in the county so I'd try that.

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Congratulations on the Gentleman Farm Bob. Now, how long does it take to cut up the Dragons? How many do you need to get through the Winter?:scratchchin:

Well at my house everyone has their job.

I shoot them. Usually about two maybe three a year which is plenty to get through the year. In Georgia we can kill 12 a year. Anymore than that and the meat tends to get freezer burned before its consumed.

 

The dog tracks them if necessary.

 

My son drags them if necessary, usually only a few yards to closest place riding lawn mower and trailer can reach. He also will field dress them under my direct supervision. Got that down to about ten minutes.

 

The processor down the road butchers and packages the meet and does the taxidermy if requested. We all use to do this ourselves but we decided it was far easier to pay the man to do it then do it ourselves. This way I can shoot one from the porch and be back on the sofa watching tv in about 30 minutes.

 

Christine my roommate, manages the freezer and cooks the meat.

 

We all eat it. Usually about two venison meals per week.

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I'm well aware guns are better. His argument was guns give hunters an unfair advantage. I know what it's like to sit in a stand on a cold December morning. I want meat in my freezer. The does I have been seeing in my yard are so small it's sad. They barely stand to my midchest and I'm 5'6". Nah, the herds need to be thinned out. About ready to get a crossbow and start shooting them in my yard because they are plentiful. I can't shoot firearms in the county so I'd try that.

 

Hmmm,

This is where the hunting morality debate starts. I tend to avoid this debate because it is a lot like politics and religion. It's an argument you can not win. People on both sides of the argument are very adamant about there views. All sides of the argument have some validity so it boils down to personal views and opinions.

 

But for me:

I get no pleasure in killing but I do get satisfaction, sustenance and enjoyment from eating.

Morally I do not believe we should divorce ourselves from the process of gathering our food and pride my ability to be self sufficient if need be. Hunting, fishing and growing are basic skills I believe everyone should have.

With that said when I kill I feel it is my responsibility to the animal to do it as efficiently as possible. If a high powered rifle with a dialed in scope and practiced marksman skills are an unfair advantage over the animal. I say it is an advantage we owe the animal.

 

IMHO, I think those that don't understand this point should reevaluate their hunting philosophy.

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Bob first. Congrats on the purchase of your place. As for the hunting I enjoy both gun and bow. I started bow hunting at 13 and gun at 16. Of all the deer that I have shot at with a bow only four were lost. I feel that if I can't get a good shot I don't take it and will let it walk.

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Bob first. Congrats on the purchase of your place. As for the hunting I enjoy both gun and bow. I started bow hunting at 13 and gun at 16. Of all the deer that I have shot at with a bow only four were lost. I feel that if I can't get a good shot I don't take it and will let it walk.

 

Charles,

Thank you for your congratulations.

I too have enjoyed hunting for a lifetime with gun, bow and primitive weapons. Considering the hundreds of deer I've killed I deeply regret the few I've lost and not retrieved. I do acknowledge and respect the ethical sporting aspect of hunting and the right to do so. I do believe in fair chase and am personally committed to ethical standards in the practice and preservation of those legal rights.

 

I only hope for the opportunity to do so and enjoy this privilege with you and other like minded persons as circumstances might allow. Come on down.

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I get where your coming from too Bob.. Not saying in anyway, shape, manner or form that Kat fits into this category but it sort of seems like taking the responsibility of meticulously tracking wounded animal's has gone the same way as other examples of accepting personal responsibilities in some cases IMHO... Bottom line, if you run a broad head thru one and cant find it - you owe the wounded and dieing animal your complete undivided attention until the meat rotting clock runs out. If it's refrigrator cool ya got 3 days of walking a grid - if its still summer time warm, 36 hours, all to the tune of not returning to the tree stand till you have done all you can do. I know thru the years I have dropped em in their tracks with a broad head to the spine (hunting from tree stands A LOT = A BLAST!!) and also have cut major arteries and had em drop within 50 yards but = tracking and flat out DONT QUIT skills are a must for Bow Hunters.. I have found more than one in the pouring rain of October in Michigan by walking a grid FOR HOURS and because of pure stubborness - like Roller has mentioned - can thankfully count on one hand the ones that went to Coyote/Skunk/Possum food.

Only difference between my perspective and yours probably is I honestly think (and have found from experience by the amount of dead and decaying deer laying around after opening day of Gun Deer) that hunting them with a gun for the unskilled hunter can be almost worst than with a bow. It seems that some folks think that just cause the meat didnt fall when they pulled the trigger that a miss happened and, amazingly, lots of unknowing hunters will just shrug the shoulder and assume the deer is fine = majorly short sighted and wrong IMHO.

 

By the way Superman = CONGRATS on your new home purchase!!

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I get where your coming from too Bob.. Not saying in anyway, shape, manner or form that Kat fits into this category but it sort of seems like taking the responsibility of meticulously tracking wounded animal's has gone the same way as other examples of accepting personal responsibilities in some cases IMHO... Bottom line, if you run a broad head thru one and cant find it - you owe the wounded and dieing animal your complete undivided attention until the meat rotting clock runs out. If it's refrigrator cool ya got 3 days of walking a grid - if its still summer time warm, 36 hours, all to the tune of not returning to the tree stand till you have done all you can do. I know thru the years I have dropped em in their tracks with a broad head to the spine (hunting from tree stands A LOT = A BLAST!!) and also have cut major arteries and had em drop within 50 yards but = tracking and flat out DONT QUIT skills are a must for Bow Hunters.. I have found more than one in the pouring rain of October in Michigan by walking a grid FOR HOURS and because of pure stubborness - like Roller has mentioned - can thankfully count on one hand the ones that went to Coyote/Skunk/Possum food.

Only difference between my perspective and yours probably is I honestly think (and have found from experience by the amount of dead and decaying deer laying around after opening day of Gun Deer) that hunting them with a gun for the unskilled hunter can be almost worst than with a bow. It seems that some folks think that just cause the meat didnt fall when they pulled the trigger that a miss happened and, amazingly, lots of unknowing hunters will just shrug the shoulder and assume the deer is fine = majorly short sighted and wrong IMHO.

 

By the way Superman = CONGRATS on your new home purchase!!

 

Thanks also Puc,

I get it and your right using a gun is not an 100%guarantee. The mindset of the Hunter to me is the most important factor. I do not condone unethical and irresponsible hunting. The good thing is, on my twenty acres I have control, unless poachers try to trespass. Planning on investing in posted signs.

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My current feelings about bow hunting stems from an incident that happened the first year I lived here.

 

I had set up a ladder stand watching the field and had a doe walk straight to me during bow season. Due to the short distance I was almost sure I hit it good before it ran out of sight. When I got down there was not a speck of Blood trail. I still searched my property and the adjoining properties for days using the dog to help track. 3 days still no dead deer. I was sick about the possibility of wounding a deer and not retrieving it. For weeks I played the shot scene over and over in my head. I finally had to rule out one last scenario so I bought one of those hand held wand type metal detectors and went to the spot where the deer was standing when I shot. After a few minutes of crawling around on my knees I found the arrow under the leaves and a log where the deer had been standing. There was no signs of Blood or hair anywhere around or on the arrow.

 

I was relieved that I did not wound the deer and at the same time mad that I put myself through all of that.

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