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I always pull the tank just to be sure I do not ding it with a tool. On my Venture I pull the front dog bone struts also, those I pull one at a time just to be sure the motor does not shift, I am not sure if it would with both dog bones out or not, but why take the chance, I can only work on one plug at a time so there is no reason to have both off at the same time.

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I all ways pull the tank completely off.

There is one electrical connection and a rubber vent hose under the plastic cowl that is around the ignition switch.

 

Make sure you turn the petcock to off before you pull the fuel line, (do not ask :)).

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lift it enough to get to the plugs

I roll up a towel and place it between the tank and the frame

helps keep the tank in place and leaves plenty of room

 

I have never taken the tank off I change the plugs every season

 

hope this helps

 

:080402gudl_prv:

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Great info! Thanks so much.

 

And, yes, I WILL remember to turn the petcock off if it totally remove the tank. Lol.

 

I'm gonna try to do it by just unbolting it and raising it for just enough room. Probably will you the towel trick as described above.

 

BTW, does anybody have any jazzy plugs that you recommend that perform better than the stock ones?

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I do NOT remove the fuel tank or anything else when changing the spark plugs. If you do, that is your choice, but it is not mandated.

 

I also use NGK Iridium spark plugs. They truly do last 75,000 miles. For the small extra cost of these plugs, they are well worth it, as you do not have to change the plugs as often.

 

I have been using NGK Iridium spark plugs for the last 400,000 miles of riding, and have never had one fail, and always get at least 75,000 out of a set.

 

Miles

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  • 2 months later...

And always a touch of anti-seize on the plug threads.

 

Suggest using a short piece of fuel line around the end of the plug to start it. If the plug is cross threaded, the fuel line will slip. If the plug is lined up well, it will screw in until the seat. Then use the torque wrench.

 

RR

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Guest tx2sturgis
And always a touch of anti-seize on the plug threads.

 

Suggest using a short piece of fuel line around the end of the plug to start it. If the plug is cross threaded, the fuel line will slip. If the plug is lined up well, it will screw in until the seat. Then use the torque wrench.

 

RR

 

The hose idea is a good one, but using antisieze is not always a good idea. If you get too much on the threads, it can act as an electrical insulator, not a good thing since the plug threads have to make a low-resistance connection to the threads they are inserted into, so the plug will be electrically grounded.

 

Its up to the individual of course, but some factory technical bulletins advise against it.

 

Disclaimer: I'm not sure if Yamaha does or does not advise it. If someone knows for SURE, I will accept that opinion.

 

 

 

 

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The RSV manual doesn't call for it. Harley specifies that you use

LOCTITE® C5-A® Copper Grade Anti-Seize on V-Rod spark plugs, it has copper and graphite in the compound so it does conduct electricity. Here is a good site if you want to know the properties of a particular version of Loctite: http://www.henkel.mx/mxe/content_data/83749_LT3355v4_MROantiseize.pdf

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  • 2 months later...
Removal of the dog bones is required , removing or loosening the tank is not

Just my :2cents: but I it is sure easier with the tank off and on top of that I always run a vacuum cleaner hose over the plugs before I remove them to be sure no foreign body (like a rock) falls into the spark plug hole. :shock3:

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The RSV manual doesn't call for it. Harley specifies that you use

LOCTITE® C5-A® Copper Grade Anti-Seize on V-Rod spark plugs, it has copper and graphite in the compound so it does conduct electricity. Here is a good site if you want to know the properties of a particular version of Loctite: http://www.henkel.mx/mxe/content_data/83749_LT3355v4_MROantiseize.pdf

 

Oh damn... something else to buy

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  • 1 month later...
It is not 100% needed if you have the right tool. If you have the articulate cricket wrench don't need to. However, to be safe is better do it.

 

Regards,

 

What is a "articulate cricket wrench" and where do I buy one? I think having to take the tank off for something as simple as changing the plugs is about the stupidest design features. Really the only thing about my RSTD that I dislike.

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  • 2 months later...
The RSV manual doesn't call for it. Harley specifies that you use

LOCTITE® C5-A® Copper Grade Anti-Seize on V-Rod spark plugs, it has copper and graphite in the compound so it does conduct electricity. Here is a good site if you want to know the properties of a particular version of Loctite: http://www.henkel.mx/mxe/content_data/83749_LT3355v4_MROantiseize.pdf

 

 

Loctite on a Harley........unheard of!:rotf:For a clothing manufacturer, they don't make a bad bike!!!!!

Edited by Blinker
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