Jump to content
IGNORED

Rear End Gear Ratio Conversions For Hannigans


Recommended Posts

OK I'm discovering part of the the reason for lower gas mileage besides the additional weight. While cruising today, I notice 5th gear is actually useable at speeds as low as 45 as opposed to useless under 55. Soooo, I'm thinking that the gear ratio is a tad tall. Has anybody done any research on this?? I am also considering slightly larger diameter tires for better gas mileage. I know, Hannigan is adimate about using only that tire size, and I have to admit, the speedometer is dead nuts on, but I use my GPS for the speedometer so maybe I will experiment.

 

Any suggestions or input??

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is geared like if you were to install the VMAX rear end.

I also think the rear end gear ratio is lower not taller,

and the speedo is dead nuts on. not sure yet if I would mess

with the tallness/larger of the tire yet, not much room left in there as

when going into a turn it really works, the suspension I mean.

that outside tire Will go up father. there is no tipping effect

with these rear ends. after year of riding this way I am starting to

take turns even faster now. :D it really sticks to the road.

 

Another thing to keep in mind is that if you raise the rear you

will be then effecting the rake for your now new power steering

that you just paid $1500 for :rolleyes:

 

 

Let me know what you come up with in the future. make sure

you check your rear brake disk in about 1000 miles for (grooving)

as there supplier as been putting the wrong brake pads on the

when they send Hannigan the assembly. Hannigan with ship out new

rotors and pads FedEx if this happens to you ASAP. the supplier put

pads in for stainless steal rotors , ours are cast. *oops*

(just my 3 cents worth)

Good luck ride safe.

Jeff

Edited by Cougar
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tire size also effects your final drive, If you put a larger tire on the rear, it is like having a taller gear, that is where you get the better mileage. If you are concerned with the power now, do not raise your tire size you will be even more disappointed.

 

:2cents:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good points, Jeff!

 

I always thought "Tall" meant higher ratio like 4.13 as oposed to 3.83 but could be wrong. Wouldn't be the first time!

 

Yes, I was wondering exactly how much extra room there was in the suspension. Back in the day, the rule was keep adding size until you start to hit rubber, then beef things up or gingerly hammer metal out of the way...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob,

 

The bigger the number the lower the gear. A 4.10 gear has more torque than a 3.73.

 

For instance on my truck I installed a lift kit and 35 inch tires. Stock gear ratio is 3.73, on my speedo I show over 10% slower speed than I am actually going by GPS, and when I check my mileage, it ain't changed. I still get a terrible 14mpg. To correct my speedo I need to go down to a 4.10 gear to get back the original power ratio as stock.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I did change mine from 3:44 to 3:83 with no noticeable change in gas mileage, which was the reason for the change. Performance didn't change either. So when I had other issues and the rear axle necessitated change I reverted back to the 3:44. I have often times wandered if the 3:08 used by the GL1500 goldwings or the 2:92 used by the GL1800 goldwings would have worked? Should it be necessary to change for any reason I will change the ratio again.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bob,

 

The bigger the number the lower the gear. A 4.10 gear has more torque than a 3.73.

 

For instance on my truck I installed a lift kit and 35 inch tires. Stock gear ratio is 3.73, on my speedo I show over 10% slower speed than I am actually going by GPS, and when I check my mileage, it ain't changed. I still get a terrible 14mpg. To correct my speedo I need to go down to a 4.10 gear to get back the original power ratio as stock.

 

 

Yes I know that, the higher the ratio the better the torque, but the more RPM's for the same speed.You run a high ratio rear end for drag racing to launch better, and a low ratio for lower rpm for economy at highway speeds. Quick change rear ends were the thing to have in the 60's with muscle cars, one set of gears for the drags, and another set for trips. I thought taller meant higher ratio but perhaps I was wrong. It's been years...

 

Anyway, yes the T'Bird rear end in the Hannigan does make it act more like it has a VMax rear but I would be willing to sacrifice the ratio for better economy. It seems responsive enough of the line, but I am definately running higher RPM's at highway speeds i.e. 70 MPH range...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tri-Wing kits use a 3:42 gear ratio which puts it midway between the stock Rsv 3:02 ( I think?) & a V-max at 3:73. The difference is about 250 rpm at 70 mph with the 3:42 gearing as opposed to about 500 rpm of the V-max's.

I've been told that the hannigan uses a 3:73 gearing as well thus matching the V-maxs ratio.

Last summer coming back from the International rally with B2Dad on his Hannigan trike we would both fill up at the same time and consistanly he'd use about a 1/2 gal or a bit more fuel between stops than I did.

Larry

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 years later...
Yes I know that, the higher the ratio the better the torque, but the more RPM's for the same speed.You run a high ratio rear end for drag racing to launch better, and a low ratio for lower rpm for economy at highway speeds. Quick change rear ends were the thing to have in the 60's with muscle cars, one set of gears for the drags, and another set for trips. I thought taller meant higher ratio but perhaps I was wrong. It's been years...

 

Anyway, yes the T'Bird rear end in the Hannigan does make it act more like it has a VMax rear but I would be willing to sacrifice the ratio for better economy. It seems responsive enough of the line, but I am definately running higher RPM's at highway speeds i.e. 70 MPH range...

 

if your talking FORD t-bird/ Mercury cougar mid 90 with the IRS set up. automatics had stock a 2.80 or 3.08 ratio it was possible to get a 3.23 special order .also anything over that 3.50 and up was aftermarket install on that car

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri-Wing kits use a 3:42 gear ratio which puts it midway between the stock Rsv 3:02 ( I think?) & a V-max at 3:73. The difference is about 250 rpm at 70 mph with the 3:42 gearing as opposed to about 500 rpm of the V-max's.

I've been told that the hannigan uses a 3:73 gearing as well thus matching the V-maxs ratio.

Last summer coming back from the International rally with B2Dad on his Hannigan trike we would both fill up at the same time and consistanly he'd use about a 1/2 gal or a bit more fuel between stops than I did.

Larry

 

V-max stock is 3.67 (9 tooth pinion, 33 tooth ring), 1st and 2nd gen Ventures stock are 3.33 (10 tooth pinion, 33 tooth ring).

As to getting better gas mileage. I want to change my truck from 3.42 to 4.10 to get better gas mileage. A big part of the equation is your "normal" driving. as to what would work best on a trike, I have no clue.

Link to post
Share on other sites
V-max stock is 3.67 (9 tooth pinion, 33 tooth ring), 1st and 2nd gen Ventures stock are 3.33 (10 tooth pinion, 33 tooth ring).

As to getting better gas mileage. I want to change my truck from 3.42 to 4.10 to get better gas mileage. A big part of the equation is your "normal" driving. as to what would work best on a trike, I have no clue.

http://www.mpgenhance.com/differential.html

What does this all mean you ask? Well the bottom line is that the smaller the pinion gear or higher the numerical ratio i.e. 4.10 to 1 (a typically high ratio) means that the quicker your acceleration will be and the lower your car’s top speed that can be reached will be as well. You will be going through the transmission gears more quickly while driving and achieving a faster acceleration but will be losing fuel economy as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.mpgenhance.com/differential.html

What does this all mean you ask? Well the bottom line is that the smaller the pinion gear or higher the numerical ratio i.e. 4.10 to 1 (a typically high ratio) means that the quicker your acceleration will be and the lower your car’s top speed that can be reached will be as well. You will be going through the transmission gears more quickly while driving and achieving a faster acceleration but will be losing fuel economy as well.

 

 

 

Yea, what he said!!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.mpgenhance.com/differential.html

What does this all mean you ask? Well the bottom line is that the smaller the pinion gear or higher the numerical ratio i.e. 4.10 to 1 (a typically high ratio) means that the quicker your acceleration will be and the lower your car’s top speed that can be reached will be as well. You will be going through the transmission gears more quickly while driving and achieving a faster acceleration but will be losing fuel economy as well.

 

Not necessarily.

In my case almost all of my driving is stop and go city driving. In my case having easier acceleration from a stop and the slightly higher engine speed while driving slow will actually put the engine at a more economical speed for the majority of my driving. That is why I specified that part of the equation is YOUR "normal" driving. I do understand that I will give up a bit of gas mileage at highway speed due to the numerically higher gear ration, but the ease of acceleration at low speed will actually give me an overall better fuel economy. My top speed will not change because that is controlled by the computer speed limiter. which cuts in way before red line or running out of horse power. At least my MPG improvement will start to happen once I stop playing with the potential faster acceleration.:whistling: Since my bike is also primarily a city commuter, I have been thinking of putting in the V-Max gears for the same reasons.

 

The best gear ratio depends on your specific use. What is best for me may not be best for you. This is the point that I am trying to get across. That is why they make all these different gear ratios.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Not necessarily.

In my case almost all of my driving is stop and go city driving. In my case having easier acceleration from a stop and the slightly higher engine speed while driving slow will actually put the engine at a more economical speed for the majority of my driving. That is why I specified that part of the equation is YOUR "normal" driving. I do understand that I will give up a bit of gas mileage at highway speed due to the numerically higher gear ration, but the ease of acceleration at low speed will actually give me an overall better fuel economy. My top speed will not change because that is controlled by the computer speed limiter. which cuts in way before red line or running out of horse power. At least my MPG improvement will start to happen once I stop playing with the potential faster acceleration.:whistling: Since my bike is also primarily a city commuter, I have been thinking of putting in the V-Max gears for the same reasons.

 

The best gear ratio depends on your specific use. What is best for me may not be best for you. This is the point that I am trying to get across. That is why they make all these different gear ratios.

 

 

Even in city driving there will probably be no increase in fuel economy in the TRUCK scenario. On a Pre fuel injection Big Bore Yamaha with the vacuum operated butterflies there will be an improvement but the same thing could be achieved by staying in a lower gear. Leaving the better ratio available should you get the oprritunity to cruise.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...